Create Your Own Shibori Print Wallpaper

This Lowe's DIY is totally elevated.

Create Your Own Shibori Print Wallpaper
Courtesy of Lowe's.

Whether you're a fan of Rebecca Atwood, St. Frank, or the numerous textile designers that have put shibori in all of our homes, then you're going to love this DIY. Wallpaper is definitely having a moment right now, but unfortunately high-end prints can get pretty pricey. As a part of Lowe's digital series The Weekender, designer Monica Mangin taught her viewers how to create Shibori wallpaper with just a few simple materials. If you want to cut costs, get crafty, and totally make a trendy statement, check out this DIY below.

DIY Shibori Wallpaper


Tools

Tape Measure
Level
Wallpaper Kit
Utility Knife

Materials

HGTV HOME by Sherwin-Williams Dyed Indigo Paint
Paint Brush
Spray Bottle
Wallpaper Paste
Paintable Wallpaper

Instructions

1. Divide the wallpaper width by the number of squares desired to determine the size of the grid. We used Graham & Brown paintable wallpaper from Lowe’s. Remember to make sure your pieces are long enough so you have an overlap on the ceiling and floor. You can trim that off once the paper is adhered where you want it. 

2. Unroll the wallpaper on your work surface. Measure and then mark out a grid lightly with pencil. Use a ruler or level to keep the lines straight. Keep your pattern consistent. Each piece should line up seamlessly with the next.

3. Mist the wallpaper surface lightly with water.

4. Dip a 2-4-inch chip brush in indigo paint and freehand a grid a few lines at a time. You can use any color you like — or use a couple of different colors for added interest.

5. Lightly spray with water. This will allow us to blur the lines a bit, creating the signature shibori pattern.

6. When you've finished painting the pattern on the entire sheet, let it completely dry. Dry times vary depending on heat and humidity.

7. Now it’s time to hang it up. Lightly brush wallpaper glue on the backside of the paper. Press onto the wall and smooth out all the bumps and air bubbles. If you have a stubborn air bubble, take a blade and make the tiniest hole, and then gently press out the air.

I am Lonny's Senior Associate Editor. You can find me writing about interior tips, scouting out the coolest new spots, and rallying behind amazing female entrepreneurs. You can reach me at shelby.wax@livingly.com or on Instagram @shelbywax.
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