The Month's Top Finds

New beginnings never looked so good. Here, the best ways to celebrate the season, courtesy of market editor Cat Dash

An airy corner featuring a few of spring's best planters, with plants by Costa Farms. Shot on location at Patina in Brooklyn, New York.
An airy corner featuring a few of spring's best planters, with plants by Costa Farms. Shot on location at Patina in Brooklyn, New York.


As much as we’d love to be frolicking in a verdant glen right now, for much of the country, March is very much a month of transition. No matter. Here’s proof that even a whitewashed urban loft in Bushwick, Brooklyn, can emulate a sun-splashed Palm Beach poolside compound. With the help of a few of our favorite planters of the moment—modern vessels in concrete, leather, and more—the humble houseplant can show off its silhouette at various elevations. Add some pillows, stools, and a midcentury sofa reupholstered in a tropical print (courtesy of our collaborators at Patina), and you’d never guess spring was still around the corner.

The Month's Top Finds
MODERN-DAY MINIMALIST
Designer Kristina Dam in her Copenhagen home with her Cube Table and illustrations. At right, her Diamond Sculpture.
Designer Kristina Dam in her Copenhagen home with her Cube Table and illustrations. At right, her Diamond Sculpture.

Pale oak and polished marble—punctuated by hints of brass and blackened steel—make up much of the materials palette of Kristina Dam’s collection. The Copenhagen-based designer, who originally trained as an architect at the Royal Danish Academy of Fine Arts, brings functional warmth to the idea of a perennially cool Nordic sensibility. A magazine holder comes topped with a square of marble that serves as a perch for a cup of coffee; a wall-mounted mirror creates visual tension with a mixture of antiqued glass and patinated copper. Art prints and posters, along with the odd sculptural object, reference her architectural background while showcasing the simple beauty of geometry. If only order could always be this alluring.

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT The Sans Serif Vases. An Abstraction of FJ illustrations. Dam's Mobile, Architects' Houses illustrations, and Bedcover. The Magazine Keeper. Italic candlesticks. 
CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT The Sans Serif Vases. An Abstraction of FJ illustrations. Dam's Mobile, Architects' Houses illustrations, and Bedcover. The Magazine Keeper. Italic candlesticks. 
ON A ROLL
The Vienna pattern in Sara Story's second wallpaper collection.
The Vienna pattern in Sara Story's second wallpaper collection.

Hana holds a special place in my memory,” says interior designer Sara Story of the remote enclave on Maui’s eastern shore. “My mother took my sisters and me there when we were growing up, and I remember the beauty in the sunrises, the black-sand beaches, and the waterfalls.” It is this rhapsodic recollection of nature in its pristine form that Story channels into her second wallpaper collection, available this month through Holland & Sherry and De Sousa Hughes. The four designs (each available in four colorways) are inspired by her international travels, from the delicate florals of Bandol to the batik- and block-print motifs of Bora Bora. The final pattern, Vienna, references both the ornamentation of the turn-of-the-20th-century Secessionist art movement and a trip Story took to the Austrian capital with her son Duke. Here’s one family tradition that’s paying dividends for all.

 

The Month's Top Finds
Vienna, above left, and Bandol, both by Sara Story Design.
Vienna, above left, and Bandol, both by Sara Story Design.
MAKING A BLANKET STATEMENT
Not your grandmother's patchwork: the debut of Louise Gray quilts. 
Not your grandmother's patchwork: the debut of Louise Gray quilts. 


A cutting-edge quilt company from Minneapolis was one of our most exciting discoveries at this year’s NY NOW show. Launching March 16, Louise Gray is the brainchild of Alexandra Gray Bennett and Jocelin Johnson, whose contemporary aesthetic and socially conscious ethos (each blanket is 100 percent cotton and handcrafted by local artisans) push the boundaries of tradition while affirming its significance. “My mother has been a quilter her entire life and taught me at a young age,” says Bennett, who handles sales and marketing for the fledgling brand. “It was this family heritage, coupled with an appreciation for mindful consumerism, that formed the inspiration for the company.” Striking color blocking and a disciplined palette mean the effect is more Scholten & Baijings than Laura Ingalls Wilder. This is our kind of heirloom piece.

Each of the Minneapolis company's blankets is handmade by local artisans. 
Each of the Minneapolis company's blankets is handmade by local artisans. 

I'm the former Executive Editor of Lonny.
Comments